Background History and faces behind Reading and Remembrance

Developed for educators by educators

AngieWriter, curator and editor Angelika (Angie) Littlefield created Reading and Remembrance while Executive Director of the Durham West Arts Centre. With 33 years in education, she’s researched and written eight years of materials for Reading and Remembrance with Ontario curricula in mind. As well as all the projects above on which she worked with Mary, she’s written Angelika Hoerle: Comet of Cologne Dada, The Ten Grossest Bugs and The Ten Deadliest Plants. She’s currently working on Walking with Oma the story of her grandmother’s family and The Ten Most Amazing Health Stories. 2011 Newspaper story.


Mary CookMary Cook: Mary’s broad experiences as a photographer, website designer and graphic designer have assisted the SilverStone Gallery Pickering Village Museum Foundation, the Durham West Arts Centre, the PineRidge Arts Council as well as numerous community groups. She worked on The Art of Dissent: Willy Fick and Elisapee of the Arctic: Mallikjuag Adventureas an editor and designer, on the play Angelika’s Promise as a designer and on The Thomsons of Durham: Tom Thomson’s Family Heritageas a photographer. Mary has been the graphic designer and web master for Reading and Remembrance since 2005.


Angie and MaryDurham-based Reading and Remembrance site honours veterans

Photo courtesy of Metroland Media Group's Durham Region Division

Teaching remembrance to our young people
Reading and Remembrance Project an excellent resource for educators


Thank you for participating in Reading and Remembrance 2011. We have placed the Honour Roll of registered schools on-line and hope you will download a copy for your class and school.

This year we have added to the “how to” YouTube video with one that features students from Westcreek PS in Pickering, and veterans attending the dress rehearsal of their Remembrance Day play.

If you have a YouTube video you would like us to link to, please send the link and we will place it on the website.

Reading and Remembrance is not just a November lesson project but useful all year round and we hope you take full advantage of the ready-to-teach material. For February 2012 we will add the Black History Month Minutes feature with two totally new Minutes to inspire Character Education for anyone.

Watch for Reading and Remembrance 2012 coming on-line to a computer near you in the summer.

Thanks,
Angie Littlefield and Mary Cook
Project Managers


Durham West Arts CentreIn 2005, the Year of the Veteran, Reading and Remembrance was started by Executive Director, Angie Littlefield. This project has inspired educators across Ontario to sign-up their class and school and participate in this province-wide project.

The chosen theme is left to the teacher.

OHS Pres Award Robert Leech Paul Cordingley Angie Littlefield

From left: OHS Past President Robert Leech, Toronto; OPG Vice President of Human Resources and Business Partners Paul Cordingley and Reading and Remembrance Project Manager Angie Littlefield

June 2011, Ontario Historical Society presents OPG with the President's Award for Business

Here is Paul Cordingley's acceptance speech.

We’re proud to support such a program. It is an investment that ensures Ontarians have a means to learn about, and benefit from, their history. It is an investment that protects and honours the rich history of our province.

As some of you may know, the Reading and Remembrance Programme was created by Angie Littlefield and Mary Cook of the Durham West Arts Centre as a locally-developed initiative for youth-based education for Remembrance Day and Veteran’s Week.

Six years later, the initiative has grown into a province-wide program reaching over 100,000 students. It has expanded to serve Ontario youth as a free, on-line learning tool that encourages literacy, inspires an interest in local history and demonstrates the value of those who risked and sacrificed their lives for the life we enjoy today.

As a founding sponsor of the program, OPG has seen it grow into a much sought after education resource—one that touches every subject area in the Ontario curriculum. The program draws focus to Canada’s contributions since the First World War and the reasons we must honour Canadian veterans.

OPG is an Ontario-based electricity generation company and a primary employer in many communities across the province.

We take our responsibility to be a good corporate citizen and neighbour seriously. We believe in being engaged members of the community. This has been a guiding principle in our company for over 10 years.

Our Corporate Citizenship Program helps support local grassroots initiatives with a focus on community education and the environment. The CCP program is about creating a productive, unifying and more rewarding environment for future generations.

Being a part of a community is so much more than simply doing business there. It’s about helping the community thrive.

The Reading and Remembrance Programme reflects OPG’s vision of citizenship and local contribution.

We are proud to support such a meaningful initiative and honoured to be recognized here today.


OPGOntario Power Generation is pleased to be able to partner on efforts bettering our environment and providing enhanced educational opportunities for youth, along with community building projects. That’s why we’re proud to be a founding partner of Reading and Remembrance. This program offers educators ready-made, curriculum-based lesson packages that are interesting to students and promote literacy. It also promotes understanding and appreciation for our veterans who waged war so that we might enjoy peace and freedom.

We hope that you will add your name to the ever-growing list of participants.

Elsie HethermanA Special Thank YOU to Elsie Hetherman who has selflessly worked with the veterans in Pickering.
The selection below should go to the title page of the web. It’s by Ross Ferguson.
Dear Veteran of the War of 1812. As someone who fought for this country I’d like you to know that … I know the sacrifices you made for this country. The family and friends you left behind, the homes that were disrupted by lost ones never to be the same again and the memories of the atrocities you must have carried with you the rest of your life.


Mark Holland MPFew things ignite as much passion and interest among Canadians as the stories of Canada’s heroic veterans and wartime history. Our country’s remarkable wartime legacy fills us all with deep pride, unites us as Canadians, and – given the important place Remembrance has in our society – passing this legacy down to our youth should be a top priority.

That’s why Mark Holland supports a unique online literacy program that uses Canada’s wartime stories to inspire our youth to read and learn, started right here by the Durham West Arts Centre.  The program is called Reading & Remembrance and it is perfect for youth and educators, providing free online ready-to-teach lesson packages.  


OHSIn 2009 the Ontario Historical Society partnered with the Reading and Remembrance Programme to offer important education material for students across Ontario.

 

   
     

Thanks to our 2010 sponsors and supporters

thank you to our sponsors OHS Veterans Affairs Pickering Public Library OLA OPG DWAC

Links for Remembrance Day | Veterans' Week | Womens' History Month: Canadian War Museum | Canadian Museum of Civilization | The Memory Project |
The Royal Canadian Legion |The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry | 48th Highlanders Museum | 48th Highlanders Memorial Video | Veterans Affairs Canada |
First World War Audio Archive
| Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University Library | CBC Digital Archives |
The Historica-Dominion Institute | We'll Never Forget by Jean Miso | Poppy Manual

Anciens Combattants Canada | La Légion royale canadienne | Le Projet Mémoire | Musée canadien des civilisations | Musée canadien de la guerre
Livres Rares et Collections Spéciales, Bibliothèques de McGill | La force francophone | Des femmes sur tous les fronts
Institut Historica-Dominion | Commission de la capitale nationale | Manuel du coquelicot